Latino Leadership Teamwork and Entrepreneurial Spirit

Scout Rafael Ramirez and family of Del Sol Bakery in Ossining

Latino Entrepreneurial and Business Success Starts Young

 

Leading any action requires your best effort.

When it’s time to take action, Boy Scouts learn that they need to implement their skills quickly and effectively, without hesitation. Second thoughts and hesitation allow for lost opportunities.

Participating in Boy Scouts is an excellent opportunity for Latinos seeking how to teach young children values and leadership skills (between the ages of six and eighteen).

Boy Scouts operates in packs or troops that are guided by an adult who helps these young children to set achievable advancement goals, which are designed according to the Scout’s age. Adult volunteers help boys and girls keep track of their accomplishments, and their efforts are recognized while making sure the Scouts are also having fun along the way.

Being a Scout helps to show boys and girls that significant long-term and short-term goals are within reach. Scouts realize they can become a greater person with effort and patience. By the age of eighteen, they can obtain the highest rank within the Boy Scouts of America, Eagle Scout.

This rank is the highest honor a Scout can receive in terms of values, standards, and principles. All Scouts feel confident enough to pursue their life goals with the help of core values that they began to learn in first grade.

How does this happen exactly?

I’m frequently asked by Latino parents, “What’s so special about Boy Scouts?”

As always, my response is that these children have more opportunities to become successful. If these boys follow through with the program, they will open doors to becoming an entrepreneur in two ways:

Leading and success

When Scouts’ projects are successful, they recognize that they’ve worked hard to achieve great results.

 They also know that they’ve conducted themselves according to the rules and beliefs of the Scout Oath and Law. One example of this is the Popcorn Sale, which happens between October to November.

Popcorn and entrepreneurial lesson

 Scouts, their families, and the whole Scout community move mountains to help Scouts fundraise and earn the funds needed for the operation of their troops.

All scouts and leaders must focus on their sales and the way they meet their goals is by taking action: door-to-door selling outside local businesses and churches and calling family and friends. Jose Torres, Scoutmaster of Troop 2005 (based out of White Plains, NY), explains that he tries to get the most out of the experience during the popcorn sale with the boys.

“It’s amazing to see that the boys don’t get discouraged when they get no for an answer when they’re selling popcorn. They keep trying because they’ve taken on their role and they enjoy it. No matter where and how, it could be at the Hispanic Festival in White Plains or at the Microsoft Store, they always try to make a sale and seem excited about it.”

Jose also feels that the boys utilize creativity when making their sales. “They make posters and use art to promote their products. I think that is quite wonderful. I really enjoy seeing them engage with their creativity throughout the sale.”

When our Scouts jump into an enterprise with their troops, they do so knowing that these are unique opportunities to help build values. They also know that they are helping to lead their Scouts to a better future.

Next- Being a task leader requires completion.

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About the author

Rocio Guerrero

Rocio is an adventurer, born and raised in Mexico City, Rocio moved to New York City in her mid-twenties. Subsequently, she interned at Harvard while acquiring her Masters in Intercultural Relations in Boston. Following a succession of projects, she became an entrepreneur and a mediator while working for Yale, EF International and the Girl Scouts. Rocio joined the Boy Scouts of America to lead its expansion of the Latino youth market in the Westchester-Putnam Council. As Scoutreach Director, she steers the Council’s Hispanic Initiative and devotes her time helping young Latinos to become tomorrow’s leaders by bringing the Scouting’s story to the Latin Community.  She enjoys beach-camping with her three daughters, s’more-time, hot chocolate, and shooting rockets into the sky.

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