Foster a Culture of Learning, Your Employees Will Love You

small business employee learning

Foster a Culture of Learning, It’s a Win-Win

 

In today’s workplace, taking an “ABL” (Always Be Learning) mindset is essential. As well known football coach, Lou Holtz, once said “You're either growing or you're dying so get in motion and grow.”

While it may be extreme, the spirit of this message rings true in the modern work environment.

Let’s face it, I think we’d agree that if you’re not constantly expanding your arsenal with new skills and knowledge you’ll likely find yourself stalling in your career journey.

And it’s clear that employees and potential candidates crave the chance to build new skills -- with 87% of millennials, and 69% of non-millennials, citing "professional or career growth and development opportunities" as important to them in a job, according to research from Gallup.  

So far early business owners and founders, what can you do to foster a culture of learning that empowers your employees and helps attract and retain top talent?  

Here’s a Five Things to Consider:

1.   Understand What Your Employees Want To Be When They Grow Up

Now if the answer is “an astronaut” it might be a bit more challenging...but not impossible :)

Some employees may be more vocal about their ambitions or desired career journey, others may not. Take time to talk with your employees and as the company grows, encourage managers to do the same.

Get to know what employees are interested in, the types of skills or roles they’d like to be exposed to and how they view their career journey.

Everyone wants to feel like their employer is making an investment in them. Don’t you?

2.   Provide Opportunities for Cross-Training

In early stage startups and small businesses, there’s usually no shortage of things to do.

While this means some crazy times now and then, it also opens up some nice opportunities for employees to get involved in projects and roles well outside the job they were hired into.

Work with your team to encourage cross-training across the company.

It can start of informally - even something as simple as calling out projects in your weekly town hall that could use extra support and see who is interested in pitching in.

Over time you can work to put a more formal cross-training or rotational program in place so your employees get exposed to various aspects of the business.

Next- Tactics 3 through 5

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About the author

Dan Nieves

Dan is Chief of Staff at Frame.io, a video review and collaboration platform for the creative community. Prior to Frame.io, Dan headed up Market Engagement at Zinc, an enterprise startup transforming how we communicate in today's mobile workplace. Before his time in startups, he spent four years at Deloitte as a strategy consultant where he helped clients transform their organizations through the use of digital technology. Dan graduated summa cum laude from Loyola University Maryland. Born and raised in New York, he recently returned and is now residing in Manhattan. 

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