Making the Most of Trade Shows for your Business

Hurray...It's Textile & Yarn Expo Week in NYC!!!

 

This last week was a super busy week for fashion in the city.

I know we tend to hyper focus on the excitement that goes hand in hand with the glamour of New York Fashion Week in the city, but did you know that it’s the expo trade shows that really kick it all off. It's the behind the scenes of the fabric, yarn, trimmings, prints, marketing and manufacturing shows that provide designers with all of the best new ideas and suppliers that can help us get our ideas made into reality.

This is where we get our hands dirty and start working on the product development and putting our ideas together.

 Laying out some of the many new fabric and yarn trends that I've compiled from the trade shows--the beginning of the design process.

Trade shows are a great way to make new connections, find new resources, and stay current and up to date with new technologies in your particular field.

Even in the arena of fashion fabrics, it's truly amazing what is being developed in performance capabilities all the while keeping the fabrics looking more fashionable than just functional--wrinkle resist, water repellent, body cooling, thermal conducting, fabrics that look like woven but with 4-way stretch, 3-D knitting,....it's endless and sometimes overwhelming.

As a design director, I truly appreciate the ability of the industry to bring so many resources into the city in one week and really see the whole range of what exists in a very compacted time frame.

On the other hand, when it’s such a busy week as this week packed 4 great shows into 3 days as well as other surrounding seminars, roundtable discussions and many valuable exhibitions—it’s difficult to see it all and still manage the day to day business of my job.

One of the best ways to manage it all is to have each of my designers take on a show or a seminar and come back to report in on the key take-away ideas of the show. This helps to cover more ground effectively.

The range of shows was also well planned as it covered mass market, high end, start up, and everything in between....

Some of the shows from the past week....

 

My first show was Spin Expo NY which is the creme de la creme of the knitting industry.

It high-lights all of the newest in yarn development as well as knitting factories who can help to make your garments if you don't already have an existing relationship with a factory. As I knew I would be going to some of these expo shows, I did make a few appointments with certain suppliers that I already know and who usually come to present their newest collections.

Once they make their presentations, you can usually ask them for fabric/yarn swatches or headers.

They may even have an overall book made specifically for the expo that you can take away as a high-light of their whole collection. Definitely ask for samples and take-aways.

That's what these shows are for. They are catering to your needs and you need as much tangible ammunition to take back and keep on hand.

Sometimes the vendors will have samples ready for you to take right from the booth and other times, vendors will make your list and prepare it to ship a week or two after the show. 

After you go to so many shows and booths, it's hard to keep track of everything so make it easy and take samples, business cards (staple them to the brochures so they don't get lost), take photos of everything so you can remember your contact person and also the items you were interested in.

As soon as I get back to my office, I start to organize everything into folders to make it easy when I'm looking for something later.

At one of our suppliers, Winning Textile to see some new fine gauge yarns for some sexy body-con knit dressing 

 

 A gorgeous presentation of fall friendly chunky yarns from GTIG Huasheng

 

Sometimes the trade shows are just so busy that it's hard to get in to see the particular suppliers you really want to focus on.

The best thing to do is grab a business card and make a contact so that you can touch base after the show. And other times, the suppliers and resources who may be based overseas stay in town for a few additional days after the trade shows and can make an appointment to come to your office and spend the time to really show you the full range of their products and services.

The second show I attended was Premierevision NY.

This show is the high end, trend direction setting resource for textiles, trimmings and prints. Some of the most premium suppliers are at these shows--companies that supply fabrics to Chanel, Dior, and Jason Wu just to name a few high end designers.

Fabrics costing upwards of $100.00 a yard, BUT don't be intimidated by shows of this nature. If you're not in the high end premium fabric business, in between some of these booths, you may just find some suppliers that are more your speed. For instance, I did find a couple of booths supplying fabrics from $3.00 to $11.00 a yard that were gorgeous and just the things I could use.

It's also OK to walk into the high end booths and take a look to see what is trending--take some mental notes and keep yourself abreast of what is happening at the high end level.

I know my customers are always asking for market intelligence about what I am seeing in the industry so it's a valuable tool even though I may not actually be able to walk away with anything physically tangible to use.

Checking out NY based and made faux furs from Funtastic Furs 

 

 

Next page- More on the show and Print collections...

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About the author

Tina Trevino

Tina Trevino is the Senior Design Director of KBL Group Intl. Ltd. in NYC and manages their large creative design team and Director Community Relations for Latin Business Today. She shares all of her insight on upcoming fashion trends for the season with her team to start the collaborative design process. The company specializes in sweaters, knits and wovens. It provides product for ladies, men, contemporary, jr, and children. Tina specializes in coordinating directly with large US retailers to design exactly into their targeted customer needs. With many years under her belt in the industry, she has also gained the ability to go beyond the fashion component and help to work through sourcing, fitting, production and merchandising issues as well.