Convert a Customer to a Client Through 4 Delivery Steps [Video]

customer delivery

Four steps after the sale to ensure the customer is appreciated.

 

This is the moment for your customer, make the most of it

They have signed the contract, placed the order or handed over their money, and now your ability to really convert them from a customer to a loyal client is largely determined right here. You made the sale, they are buying from you, so how are you going to show them how much you care? How important are you going to make them feel?

I can remember when we purchased our first home. The realtor had us pick up our keys for the home from her secretary and she never spoke to us afterward. It was a starter home and it felt as though she no longer had time for us.  Therefore when you deliver whatever you sell, it is essential to make a memorable impression.

You need to think, “am I going to make the person feel important?”

For example, at Emeril’s upscale restaurant, they set down everyone’s dishes at the exact same moment; an automotive service department will give your car back impeccably washed and vacuumed at no cost; and the sales clerk at Tiffany & Co. or Nordstrom will walk around the counter to hand you your purchase and say “thank you.”

Even if you are handing off a contract, making the client feel important is critical when building a relationship with them.

When delivering properly, you need to have the following to make sure it works every time:

1.  HAVE A PLAN  

Think about how you will deliver what you sell. Everything in the world that people sell gets delivered, but some just do it better than others. Depending on what you sell, incorporate time to make them feel important, especially if the item is of high importance in their lives.

  1. Sit down and think about every detail that should always happen when you deliver what you sell.
  2. Ask your customers what they would prefer, or how they would like it better next time.
  3. Write down your specific delivery process so it is easily understood.
  4. At least twice a year, look at how this process can be improved upon, if at all.

2.  TRAIN 

Make sure that everyone in your organization understands the importance of how they make a customer feel every time you deliver something.

  1. Make sure you practice and/or train your delivery process. Some items might seem silly to have to practice, but I assure you that walking around the counter, looking the customer in the eye, and showing sincere appreciation for the customer’s business is trained and practiced.
  2. Never assume that because you have practiced it once, or trained people on it one time, that you are done. Set a schedule so that reminder trainings are done at least every 90 days.

3.  INSPECT 

As a manager and consultant, I am always observing how businesses deliver their goods and services to customers. Do they make it convenient for the customer? Do they show care?  What is the customer’s reaction every time they receive their purchase?

  1. Observe the customer’s reaction when you deliver what you sell. Are you certain they are leaving having experienced something that leaves them with complete confidence that they have made the right decision, and would likely refer you?
  2. If you have the role of a manager, make sure that whatever actions or tasks have been asked for during delivery are actually done. “Inspect what you expect” and do a little observation and/or inspection. Even call the occasional customer and ask them how they felt about how they were taken care of.

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About the author

Jaime "“Jim”" Hernandez

Jaime “Jim” Hernandez, is president of Strategic Business Communications, Inc. which ranked #4122 in INC magazine’s Fastest Growing Companies in America. He contributes a column about marketing for Latin Business Today. A motivational speaker, marketing consultant and trainer, Jim has worked with more than 30 businesses in the U.S. and abroad. He is a member of the National Advisory Board of MYM, and has been a guest lecturer on sales and marketing at the University of San Diego.

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