The Majority Minority

Hispanics are still the largest and fastest growing ethnic group in the U.S.

According to data released last May by the U.S. Census Bureau, about one-in-every-three U.S. residents is part of a group other than single-race non-Hispanic white – according to national estimates by race, Hispanic origin, and age. In 2005, the nation’s minority population totaled 98 million, or 33 percent, of the country’s total of 296.4 million.

“These mid-decade numbers provide further evidence of the increasing diversity of our nation’s population,” said Census Bureau Director Louis Kin-cannon.

Hispanics continue to be the largest minority group at 42.7 million. With a 3.3 percent increase in population from July 1, 2004 to July 1, 2005, they are the fastest-growing group.

Unless otherwise specified, the data refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more other races. The tables show data for both this group and those who reported a single race only.

It’s important to note that the federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as separate and distinct concepts. In surveys and censuses, separate questions are asked on Hispanic origin and race. The question on Hispanic origin asks respondents if they are Spanish, Hispanic, or Latino. Starting with Census 2000, the question on race asks respondents to report the race or races they consider themselves to be. Thus, Hispanics may be of any race.

Above, table 1 illustrates the fact that the second largest minority group was blacks (39.7 million), followed by Asians (14.4 million), American Indians and Alaska natives (4.5 million) and native Hawaiians and other Pacific islanders (990,000). The population of non-Hispanic whites who indicated no other race totaled 198.4 million in 2005.

Highlights for the various groups follow: Hispanics accounted for almost half (1.3 million, or 49 percent) of the national population growth of 2.8 million between July 1, 2004 and July 1, 2005. Of the increase of 1.3 million, 800,000 was because of natural increase (births minus deaths) and 500,000 was because of immigration. Table 2 illustrates this. The Hispanic population in 2005 was much younger, with a median age of 27.2 years, compared to the population as a whole at 36.2 years. About a third of the Hispanic population was under 18, compared with one-fourth of the total population. See Table 3 below.

The black population increased by 1.3 percent or 496,000 between 2004 and 2005. Of the increase of  496,000, about 407,000 was because of natural increase and 89,000 was because of immigration. The black population in 2005 was younger, with a median age of 30.0 years compared to the population as a whole at 36.2 years. About 31 percent of the black population was under 18, compared with 25 percent of the total population.

The Asian population rose by 3 percent or 421,000 between 2004 and 2005. Of the increase, 182,000 was because of natural increase and 239,000 was because of immigration. The Asian population in 2005 was younger, with a median age of 33.2 years, compared to the population as a whole at 36.2 years. About 26 percent of the Asian population was under 18, compared with 25 percent of the total population.

The American Indian and Alaska native population rose by 1 percent or 43,000 from 2004 to 2005. The American Indian and Alaska native population in 2005 was younger, with a median age of 30.7 years, compared to the population as a whole at 36.2 years. About 29 percent of the American Indian and Alaska native population was under 18, compared with 25 percent of the total population. The native Hawaiian and other Pacific islander population rose by 1.5 percent or 15,000 from 2004 to 2005.

The native Hawaiian and other Pacific islander population in 2005 was younger, with a median age of 28.2 years, compared to the population as a whole at 36.2 years. About 31 percent of the native Hawaiian and other Pacific islander population was under 18, compared with 25 percent of the total population.

The non-Hispanic, single-race white population, which represented just under 67 percent of the total population, accounted for less than a fifth (19 percent) of the nation’s total population growth. Of the increase of 500,000, about 300,000 was because of natural increase with 200,000 attributed to immigration. The non-Hispanic, single-race white population in 2005 was older than the population as a whole: the respective median ages were 40.3 and 36.2. About 22 percent of the population of this group was under 18, compared with 25 percent of the total population.

These data are based on estimates of U.S. population for July 1, 2005. The Census Bureau estimates population change from the most recent decennial census (Census 2000) using annual data on births, deaths and international migration.

RELATED POSTS

Self-Made Success of a Power Couple

Self-Made Success of a Power Couple

A power couple credits education and hard work as their ticket to the top. A Hispanic Heritage Month tribute to Latin Biz Today forerunner Latin Business magazine enjoy this Summer 2006 article. Angela Lau and Marcos Velayos do not fit your typical idea of a power...

4 Tips for Pursuing a Lemon Law Claim

4 Tips for Pursuing a Lemon Law Claim

Don't let a lemon negatively impact your small business, you do have recourse through lemon law claims   Buying a new car can be a daunting task. Yet, you never expect that a car bought from a dealer will cause problems that make the car practically unusable at...

It’s a Sweet Ride to the Top

It’s a Sweet Ride to the Top

What do you do when you're a financial whiz, a Latina, and have the desire to help Latinos start and grow businesses in the greater Los Angeles area? If you're Maria Contreras-Sweet, you establish a nice little financial empire that includes a private equity fund and...

Video Gallery

Polls

Sign Up for the Latin Biz Today Newsletter

PR Newswire

Featured Authors

avatar for Marianela ColladoMarianela Collado

Marianela Collado was born and raise...

Tax Planning and the Election Results

Innovation & Strategy

Money

Talent/HR

Legal

Marketing

Culture

Fashion

Food

Music

Sports

Work & Life

Mindfulness

Health & Fitness

Travel & Destinations

Personal Blogs

Pin It on Pinterest